Justice - Helix (Gesaffelstein Vision Remix)

Rudimental - Not Giving In (Bondax Remix)

http://soundcloud.com/fadermedia/bondaxs-fader-mix


Proxy - Funk (Bobby Champs remix)

Now that the album he made with his day job band The xx is now out and doing well, Jamie is ready to sit back down in his throne as producer/ remixer extraordinaire, starting with this sprawling seven-minute long refix of Four Tet’s equally expansive song Lion. There’s hints of Burial in here, with the rusty, shuffling drums, and though it starts with some delicate piano and descends into some quite doom-y horns, only to lift itself out towards then. Give it a listen, let us know what you think:

Remixed & switched off by Busy P in Paris
extra flavas by Boston Bun 
Busy P appears courtesy of Ed Banger records

www.facebook.com/dropthelime

Douglas Greed Feat. Delhia de France - Shiver

(Ruede Hagelstein Remix)

NuDeepNoir - http://www.youtube.com/user/NuDeepNoir?feature=watch

Hot Chip - Look At Where We Are (Major Lazer Remix)

Justice - New Lands (A-Trak Remix)

(Photo: Leigha Hodnet)

The forces that be will not let Meiko’s singer-songwriter boat glide swiftly into the night. Instead, they want her to tumble and drown in a sea of remixes. On this refit, Morgan Page goes hypnotic house on the joint with a sugary bout of wistful trance that flows seamlessly into Meiko’s indie gem and then into a firewall of synths and jackhammer drums. And then? The bass blows the entire vessel to bits. More destruction on Page’s third club album here, while Meiko’s LP is available here.

Posted by Hillary Kaylor

Tags: dance, indie

Sounding a bit like something we might’ve heard from the Tri Angle imprint last year, this remix of Lianne La Havas’ “Lost and Found” from British house DJ/producer Maya Jane Coles (pictured above) is a slow-grooving and soulful piece with just the right touches of club-ready rhythms and poignant vocal hooks. Sparse synth blips and piano chords occasionally adorn La Havas’ soft performance, while the garage-y percussion carries the whole thing to its understated conclusion—making for a nice companion to the percolating version of her “Forget” tune that Shlohmo delivered at the beginning of the year